DB2 Connect Virtual Users Group

Posted by Kim May on September 26, 2010 under DB2 Education, DB2 for i, DB2 for Linux Unix Windows, DB2 for z/OS, International DB2 Users Group (IDUG), Uncategorized. Tags: , , .

The Fillmore Group is coordinating the startup of a virtual users group of DB2 Connect users.  We are actively seeking DB2 Connect users to participate – as members, as board members, and as presenters.  We hope to have a volunteer board meet periodically and have one to two hour sessions delivered via Webex to all members quarterly.  All of this will be handled virtually, with an opt-in email contact list providing event notification to members, and an affiliated IDUG group to provide interim communication between members. 

I am planning to attend the IOD Conference and will host a meeting on Monday, October 25th, for anyone volunteering to participate as a board member.  My colleague Blaire Crowley at The Fillmore Group is working with Michael McBride at IDUG to establish the IDUG group and to collect member, board member and speaker volunteer names.  On the 25th we will have board member volunteers attending IOD get together and share a conference call with remote volunteers to work through a schedule of events for late 2010 and 2011.

The virtual users group will initially operate independent of IBM and IDUG.  Kevin Foster and Kimberly Madia on the IBM DB2 Connect team have offered assistance with speakers. 

If you are interested in joining please email Blaire Crowley at blaire.crowley@thefillmoregroup.com.  Blaire will send you instructions on joining the IDUG group and add you to the list of members.  Please (please!) let Blaire know if you would like to volunteer.

IBM/Optim Team Virtual Tech Briefing – DB2 Connect

Posted by Kim May on August 16, 2010 under DB2 Connect, DB2 for i, DB2 for Linux Unix Windows, DB2 for z/OS, Optim, Uncategorized. Tags: , , , , .

Kimberly Madia’s IBM/Optim team is hosting a Virtual Tech Briefing this Thursday:

DB2 Connect for DBAs: A Primer and Look Ahead

Whether you are a DB2 for LUW DBA who would like to access enterprise information or a z/OS DBA wondering how all those Java and .NET programmers are getting to your data, DB2 Connect is the solution.   Frank Fillmore, A DB2 Gold Consultant with an extensive history in training and consulting, will step you through a DB2 Connect primer from end-to-end, including platform architecture, DB2 Connect configuration parameters, and more. Case studies from large scale DB2 Connect health checks will be included.   IBM’s Kevin Foster, who manages the development of the product, will be on hand to discuss licensing, new packaging options such as the DB2 Connect Advanced Edition, which provides pureQuery acceleration in the box, and upcoming changes to the product.

Date: 19 August 2010
Time:  10:00-11:00AM Pacific, 1:00-2:00PM Eastern
Register here: http://ow.ly/2iAlr

Summer Services Special

Posted by Kim May on July 21, 2010 under DB2 Connect, DB2 for i, DB2 for Linux Unix Windows, DB2 for VSE&VM, DB2 for z/OS, IBM DB2 Services, InfoSphere, Optim, Q-Replication, SQL Tuning. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , .

As much as I dislike the relentless repetition that’s part of the nature of the world of blogs and twitter and listserves and email blasts, here I go with a shameless pitch for a TFG special services offering I emailed to several DB2 users earlier today.  I am doing this because, at the end of the day, the rate disparity in today’s DB2 services market baffles me.  Are the ridiculously high rates being charged eroding product adoption?  I am afraid so, which is why we are offering a summer services special. 

Read More…

DB2 Connect Virtual Briefing with the IBM Team

Posted by Kim May on June 7, 2010 under DB2 for i, DB2 for Linux Unix Windows, DB2 for z/OS, Optim. Tags: , , , , .

IBM has moved DB2 Connect support into the Optim group, as it is in some ways the original Optim solution.  Kathy Zeidenstein, who manages community outreach efforts for the Optim team (a weekly e-newsletter, content on the developerworks site, Twitter, etc.) is coordinating a DB2 Connect Virtual Briefing scheduled for August 19th.  The primary purpose of the presentation is to introduce new features in the advanced edition, however, as DB2 Connect can be used in so many ways, and is so often under-utilized, she’s invited Frank to devote some of the time allocated to delivering an overview of what DB2 Connect can do.  More information is on the way…for the moment we have the date and time reserved (mark your calendars – August 19th at 1pm Eastern), and a tentative agenda:

DB2 Connect for DBAs:  A Primer and a Look to the Future

Whether you are a DB2 for LUW DBA who would like to access enterprise information or a z/OS DBA wondering how all those Java and .NET programmers are getting to your data, DB2 Connect is the solution.  Frank Fillmore, A DB2 Gold Consultant with an extensive history in training and consulting, will step you through a DB2 Connect primer from end-to-end, including platform architecture, DB2 Connect configuration parameters, and more.  Case studies from large scale DB2 Connect health checks will be included. Kevin Foster, who manages the development of the product will be on hand to discuss packaging including licensing, new packaging options such as the DB2 Connect Advanced Edition, which provides pureQuery acceleration in the box, and upcoming changes to the product.
What you will learn:
• Why you need DB2 Connect
• How DB2 Connect is packaged and licensed
• Platform architecture
• Configuration and tuning options

As soon as I have registration information I will post it.

 

DB2 Connect Redux

Posted by Frank Fillmore on March 29, 2010 under Authorized Training Partner, DB2 Connect, DB2 Education, DB2 for i, DB2 for VSE&VM, DB2 for z/OS. Tags: , .

I’ve been seeing a lot of an old friend lately: DB2 Connect.  This is the software which enables Distributed Relational Database Architecture (DRDA) Application Requestor (AR) or “client” applications running on Linux, Unix, and Windows platforms to access DB2 “host” databases on System z and System i.  More precisely, DB2 Connect accesses an Application Server (AS) which can be DB2 for z/OS, DB2 Server for VSE&VM, or DB2 for i (Wait, shouldn’t that be DB2 for “me”?)

What we know today as DB2 Connect started out almost 20 years ago as Distributed Database Connection Services (DDCS).  Then it was amazing to access host DB2 data using a spreadsheet.  Of course it took an experienced consultant a few weeks to install and configure DDCS and it’s supporting software which relied on the Systems Network Architecture (SNA) communications protocol.  It was so difficult, The Fillmore Group had a services offering called “Client/Server in 10 Days” where we guaranteed to get DDCS working in your shop in two weeks.  Now you can install and configure DB2 Connect using TCP/IP in about an hour.

So what does DB2 Connect actually do?  At its most basic, DB2 Connect is a protocol converter that changes the character coding on the host (Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code or EBCDIC) into the equivalent used on Linux, Unix, and Windows platforms (American Standard Code for Information Interchange or ASCII).  It does lots of other things and can be a source of lots of troubleshooting and performance tuning, but EBCDIC to ASCII translation is a core function.

So what’s happening lately?  First, after a few years of no publicly available training in DB2 Connect, The Fillmore Group is holding classes: CF602 “DB2 Connect 9 to DB2 for z/OS DRDA Implementation with TCP/IP” and CF632 “DB2 Connect 9 for DB2 for z/OS Problem Determination and Performance”.  The CF602 beginning June 21 is actually nearing capacity, so if this is something you need, sign up to attend now.  CF632 starts May 17.

As a bonus, I’ve attached a DB2 Connect configuration worksheet.  If you know what it all means and can use it right away, great!  Have at it.  If not, we’ll see you in class.

Second, on the consulting side of the house we’re seeing lots of DB2 Connect activity – especially with DB2 for i.  Having a relational database directly integrated into the i5/OS operating system, System i always has been a bit of a land unto itself.  Now we’re seeing lots of activity integrating System i data into eCommerce and Business Intelligence applications.  If this is what you’re doing, let us know how we can help.

QUERYTIMEOUTINTERVAL Doesn’t Work With .NET

Posted by Frank Fillmore on August 5, 2009 under .NET, DB2 Education, DB2 for z/OS. Tags: .

I am teaching a DB2 Connect Problem Determination and Performance class next week (CF632) and had the occasion to learn something nasty from a student who will be attending.  Steve W. told me that his organization is running DB2 Connect Application Server Edition v9.5 and DB2 for z/OS v8 New Function Mode (NFM).  In this environment his .NET applications didn’t behave properly.  They failed with timeouts forced by the new SQL Interrupt Support on z/OS.  The QUERYTIMEOUTINTERVAL parameter was set to 0 seconds (no timeout – wait for SQL statements to complete execution before returning to the application) in the db2cli.ini file, so that the application should have been able to run to completion.  Unfortunately, he learned that .NET applications don’t honor QUERYTIMEOUTINTERVAL.

Here are Steve’s two – unappetizing – choices:

  1. His shop can apply the new DB2 for z/OS DSNZPARM APAR (specified in the SQL Interrupt Support link above).  Because of the APAR dependencies, this is not a simple PTF and will require lots of regression testing.
  2. He can have his .NET coders modify their code to set the CommandTimeout parameter in *all* of the .NET applications.  Probably some testing involved in making those changes, too.

Ouch.  So DB2 for z/OS CM and NFM added SQL Interrupt processing as a default that you need to PTF to disable and the override isn’t supported in that little bitty Integrated Development Environment (IDE) .NET.  Has anyone else been bitten by this?  Can IBM come up with a zap to disable the SQL Interrupt Support or find a way for .NET to honor QUERYTIMEOUTINTERVAL?

More on the db2cli.ini in an earlier post.